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#14333078 Mar 28, 2020 at 06:15 PM · Edited 4 months ago
Veteran DM
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This file's been sitting on my computer for a while, so after our session today I thought I'd post it to give you all a preview of what I've been working on lately.

Forgotten Lore is a campaign setting that I created when the 5th edition of Dungeons & Dragons was released. It became the basis for a novel-length story that I wrote and posted on the ENWorld D&D fan site. Needless to say, there are spoilers there, so don’t read it!

We still have at least 6 sessions of content left in Escape from Chult, and a whole other mod after that, so it will be quite a while before this campaign is ready for our adventuring group to sojourn into.

I’m going to post twice here: once with the background info from the campaign guide and again with more specific information for would-be players. As we get closer to being ready to play, I will post some plot hooks that can be useful in character creation.

* * *

Forgotten Lore
Campaign Guide


The Forgotten Lore campaign is set on the divided continent of Voralis, where three kingdoms rule over territory that was once part of a great empire that collapsed almost two thousand years ago. The Mai’i Empire presided over an era of great unity and accomplishments in magic and engineering. Their collapse, when it came, was swift and almost total. The Mai’i themselves disappeared almost entirely, a mystery that remains unsolved. To this day, treasure hunters comb the land looking for Mai’i artifacts or other legacies of that lost age.

Political Geography

The continent of Voralis is dominated by three kingdoms: the human kingdom of Arresh, the elvish kingdom of Tal Nadesh, and the dwarven kingdom of Ironcrest. The three kingdoms collectively control a majority of the continent on maps, but the reality is much different. Much of the territories between the three kingdoms and in the northern part of the continent are not really under direct administrative control of any state. In those regions it is common to encounter tribal groups of humanoids, hostile creatures, and bandits. Because of this separation there is little regular contact or direct trade between the three kingdoms.

Arresh

Arresh has the strongest central government of the three kingdoms. It is ruled by a monarchy; the current ruling family has been in power for over a century. King Dangren rules from Severon, the kingdom’s largest city. His eldest son, Prince Dalgran, is a skilled general and administrator.

While humans are the dominant race in Arresh, there are also large populations of other races scattered throughout the kingdom. Halflings and gnomes often live in mixed communities but also have their own villages and towns here and there. Elves and dwarves are found in Arresh more commonly than humans are found in either Tal Nadesh or Ironcrest. Half-elves, half-orcs, and tieflings are not common but are not unheard of; all three of those races face racial prejudice, in more or less increasing order.

Other power centers in the kingdom include the Apernium (a powerful and independent association of wizards and other arcanists), the Aureate Council (an advisory body of nobles), and the church of Hosrenu. Worship of Sorevas is also very common in Arresh, with a temple to that god in most small communities.

Tal Nadesh

The kingdom of the elves stretches across a vast landscape of forests, hills, and open plains. Tal Nadesh is also the name of its largest city. Nominally King Gevalaine is the equal of King Dangren of Arresh, but in practice the elvish ruler’s influence is greatly circumscribed by the power of the Advisory Council. Many of the members of the Council are arcanists, and conduct their meetings from a distance via spellcasting rituals. At the center of the elvish kingdom is a vast unspoiled zone called the Reserve. The Reserve is revered as a source of elvish magic and is tended by an organization of Tenders led by a figure known as the Druid.

Non-elves have almost no formal status in Tal Nadesh. There are settlements along the fringes of the elvish kingdom where other races live. That is where most half-elves are born, but they suffer from both formal and informal discrimination. As a result, many choose to leave when they reach adulthood.

There are few temples in Tal Nadesh, but all three gods of the Triad are worshipped. Druids are also common.

Ironcrest

Ironcrest is situated within the Iron Crags, a range of mountains that extends almost the full length of the continent. The capital actually consists of two towns: Hightown, atop the surface of a large mountain, and Underhold, which occupies a vast cavern complex within the peak. Both hill and mountain dwarves dwell within Ironcrest, the former mostly living above-ground, the latter beneath it. The dwarves are ruled by a Council of Elders who represent the various craft and trade guilds within the city. Ironcrest rules over a large territory, but most of it consists of scattered valleys within the mountains where the largest gathering of people is perhaps a large village or collection of isolated settlements. Underhold is also an access point to an endless weave of tunnels and passages that the dwarves refer to as the Sunless Realm. The Darkfall Gate that controls access to this underground land is constantly monitored by the dwarves.

Li Syval

Li Syval is the name of a prosperous city-state that dominates an archipelago off the southwestern coast of Voralis. The Syvalians are traders, and their ships travel the full length of the coastline, trading with the humans, elves, dwarves, and anyone else they find. The Syvalians do not maintain a formal navy, since none of the kingdoms are naval powers, but their merchant captains all bear a writ from the city’s Ruling Council that obligate them to defend the city if it is attacked by a foreign power.

The worship of Hosrenu is not sanctioned in Li Syval; most of the islanders worship Laesil in her aspect as Lady Fortune. There are few dwarves in Li Syval, as their dense bodies makes it very difficult for them to swim. Tieflings are more common in Li Syval than they are elsewhere on the continent.

Weltarin

Weltarin is a second continent on the far side of the Blue Deep. When ships from Li Syval first arrived there about eight hundred years ago, they found a land of dense jungles and forests. They also found deposits of electrum and ancient ruins that suggested there had once been a civilization here that might even predate the Mai’i. However, their explorations were complicated by indigenous populations of intelligent creatures that bore the traits of both animals and men, some of which proved to be quite dangerous. The Syvalians set up a series of colonies and outposts in Weltarin, but in the centuries since most of them have been abandoned due to the distance and difficulties of trade across the Blue Deep. In the current day there are only a handful of captains willing to risk the long and dangerous journey across the ocean to the few remaining bases in the new land.

Religion

All three kingdoms worship the same set of gods, known collectively as the Triad. Each has a different preferred domain in each. However, members of any race may worship the Triad in any of their aspects. Each god is worshipped under a different name in each kingdom that emphasizes a different part of the god’s portfolio.

Sorevas is the god of light and life: In Arresh, he is known as the “Lightbringer.” In Tal Nadesh, “Deathbane.” In Ironcrest, the “Lifecrafter.”

Hosrenu is the god of knowledge and nature. In Arresh he is known as the “Lorekeeper.” In Tal Nadesh, he is the “Worldfather.” Among the dwarves he is the “Forgemaster.”

Laesil is the goddess of luck and war. In Arresh she is worshipped as the “Luckmistress.” In Tal Nadesh she is the “Fatespinner.” The dwarves of Ironcrest worship her in her aspect as the lady of war, and call her the “Bladefury.” Laesil is also the patron goddess of Li Syval, where she is venerated as Lady Fortune.

Members of other races also usually worship the Triad, although sometimes under other names. A common faith among intelligent humanoids is that of Umbra, a sinister entity that grants his clerics the powers of the Death domain. There are also cults in Li Syval and elsewhere who pay homage to planar entities summoned through powerful magic. As a result, tieflings are more common in Li Syval then they are in the three kingdoms.

The symbols of Sorevas are a torch, starburst, or blazing sun. The symbols of Hosrenu are a book or scroll, sometimes blank, sometimes inscribed with runes, or a candle's flame. The symbols of Laesil are most diverse, and include a set of dice or cards, a collection of clashing weapons, an eight-pointed star, and a thundercloud.

Monastic orders are not typically directly linked to organized churches, though there are a number of monasteries shared by the two (see Crosspath, below). Some monks claim to follow philosophical paths that date back to the days of the Mai’i Empire, but given the lack of reputable sources from that era such claims are usually considered apocryphal.

History

Everyone in the three kingdoms knows of the Mai’i Empire, which at its peak ruled over most of the continent of Voralis. All accounts reference the Empire’s great lore and wealth, but the sudden and calamitous nature of its collapse has resulted in the loss of most of the specific knowledge of that era. Scholars agree that the Mai’i were in decline even before Tivolus became the last ruler to sit on the Sapphire Throne, but the exact reason and timing of its collapse remain a mystery. There is even debate as to whether the rulers of the Empire were humans, elves, or dwarves, or perhaps even another race entirely. However, there is a consensus that the ruling class of the Empire was either consumed in the collapse or otherwise just disappeared.

The fall of the Empire was followed by a period of crisis and disunity that lasted for several centuries before the rise of the three kingdoms. For a time, the three races attempted to extend their control over as much of the former territory of the Empire as they could, but ultimately they realized that this was just not possible. Large swathes of territory that were once part of the Empire remain barren and unpopulated, suggesting that environmental destruction had been part of the reason for the collapse of the Mai’i. Occasionally expeditions into these wilderness regions uncover ancient ruins or other remnants of Mai’i history. Because so much of the lore of this era focuses on the great power of the Empire, artifacts are in great demand.

About five hundred years ago, the three kingdoms joined together in a war against a monstrous entity known as the Dead King. This being, which crafted a vast army of undead creatures, briefly threatened to overwhelm the entire content before he was defeated by an allied army under the leadership of King Alephron of Arresh. Sadly, after their victory the coalition fell apart and the three kingdoms withdrew back into a separation that continues to the present day.

Economy

While there is currently little in the way of direct long-distance trade between the three kingdoms, each has a dynamic agricultural and manufacturing economy. To some extent Li Syval serves as the glue that connects the kingdoms, as their ships trade with the three kingdoms and all of the other smaller polities spread across the continent. When the colonies in Weltarin were first opened there was something of a “gold rush” (actually a platinum rush, as the exotic metal was found there in quantity), but that has since cooled as initial expectations of vast wealth were not realized. Most of the outposts there have been abandoned.

All three kingdoms use a gold-based economy, though objects made of silver and copper are also valued. In Arresh, gold pieces are called “royals.” In Tal Nadesh, gold pieces are “suns.” Some local communities also use carved pieces of rare wood as a medium of exchange. In Ironcrest, gemstones are commonly used as currency, with a complex system of valuation based on size, purity, and cut. The dwarves also accept gold coins, but for larger transactions trade bars in varying sizes stamped with a guild house’s mark are common.

Coins from Li Syval are accepted almost everywhere. In addition to gold pieces, the Syvalians use platinum squares known as Trade Marks. Marks were rare when the first colonies in Weltarin were established, but now they are at least broadly recognized and accepted, if not common.

Magic

Magic is practiced in each of the three kingdoms, though it is hardly common. The consensus among scholars is that magical talent and skill reached its peak during the height of the Mai’i Empire, and the magic practiced today is just a shadow of what was lost during that era. Organizations such as the Apernium in Arresh and the Advisory Council in Tal Nadesh retain some oversight of the practice of magic, though most spellcasters who limit themselves to cantrips or simple spells can escape their notice. In the countryside, even such limited magic can evoke wary looks or superstitious gestures from the common folk. Spellcasters capable of using third-level or higher spells are extremely rare, and to most people feats like resurrection are just fables.

The wizards of Arresh and Tal Nadesh have long maintained a network of teleportation circles within their realms, though there is only one approved link for transportation between the two kingdoms. The existence of this link is not broadly publicized. The dwarves of Ironcrest do not permit teleportation into their kingdom, and they maintain a series of wards designed to prevent intrusive magic such as scrying into their realm. They also prohibit magic that masks or conceals one’s features within Underhold, the legacy of an attempted invasion by shapeshifters from the Sunless Realm that took place almost a millennia past.

Crosspath

The campaign begins in the town of Crosspath, a community of roughly a thousand people in the northern wilderness of Arresh. Crosspath is named for the crossroads it straddles. A busy commerce once passed through the region, although these days there is little in the way of long-distance trade; the town mostly presides over the commerce of half a dozen villages located within a day’s travel to the east, west, and south. Crosspath has also served as the jumping off point for expeditions into the Dry Hills, a broad expanse of unfriendly territory that extends for over a hundred miles to the north. Treasure hunters and adventurers have long sought out Mai’i artifacts in that region, and in fact there has been the occasional cache of ancient coins or lost lore uncovered over the centuries. Most of the time, however, groups of wealth-seekers return with nothing save for empty pockets and ragged clothes, or merely disappear into the hills, never to return. To the west of the Dry Hills stands the Silent Wood, though it is well known that the wood elves that dwell there do not welcome visitors.

Crosspath has a well-stocked general store, half a dozen inns and taverns, and an assortment of basic crafts and services. A monastery stands on the eastern edge of town. A temple dedicated to Hosrenu is located there, along with a decent-sized library. Scholars and monks sometimes visit, seeking ancient wisdom or other lore. The King’s authority comes with a light touch; tax collectors come out this far only once or twice a year, and patrols by the King’s Lancers are hardly more frequent. The town lacks a baron or governor, just a mayor who is selected by the town’s landholders in an election held every three years. There town has only a small garrison commanded by a lieutenant in the King’s army; he also oversees the local militia. It is an open secret that the list of mayoral candidates is vetted by the King’s representative, who pays a visit to the town when an election is upcoming. But as long as the taxes are paid and there is no unrest in the region, Crosspath and its surrounding villages are left to go their own way.
#14333083 Mar 28, 2020 at 06:21 PM · Edited 1 month ago
Veteran DM
150 Posts
General Notes: Character Creation

None of this is final, but it's where I am right now in terms of character options. Feel free to provide feedback or make suggestions. I haven't yet decided if I am going to offer offsets for some of the restrictions placed on certain classes within this setting.

* * *

Here are some notes to guide character creation.

Human Kingdom: The campaign begins in the Kingdom of Arresh. Most of the population and nearly all of the ruling class consists of humans. Elves and dwarves are not common in Arresh, with each constituting just a few percent of the population. Trade and other contacts with the elven and dwarven kingdoms usually takes place through third parties. Populations of Small Folk (gnomes and halflings) live in the rural areas, sometimes in human villages, sometimes in their own communities. Half-orcs and half-elves are especially rare. Member of racial minorities are usually not considered to be full citizens of Arresh, no matter how long they have lived within the kingdom.

Low Magic: Forgotten Lore is set in a time centuries after the calamitous fall of a magic-dependent empire. During the collapse of the Mai’i, many of the techniques for constructing magical items were lost, and there are few practitioners living today who can make any but the least powerful items. As a result, powerful magical items are rare, and generally won’t be available for purchase in stores. On the other hand, everyday items such as healing potions and kits are fairly common (if expensive), as the techniques needed to manufacture them are well-established among the leading churches and arcane associations such as the Apernium. There is a brisk trade in Mai’i artifacts, both legitimate and fake, and such items can command high prices to the right vendors.

Elemental Steel: This is an example of a Mai’i artifact that is a popular target of treasure-hunters and other participants in the trade in rare arcana. The Mai’i had perfected the art of infusing elemental essences into metallic alloys so that they could be used to construct armor, weapons, tools, and other items. These rare alloys have inherent elemental properties and could also absorb enchantments more easily than mundane metals. An example is whitesteel, which has the property of absorbing (armor) or inflicting (weapons) cold damage. Very few smiths today know how to work with these rare alloys, so most of the trade is in finished items.

Legacy Items: When developing their character backgrounds, each player should select a legacy item for their character. This is an item that was passed on to them by a mentor, family member, or other significant figure in their backstory. The DM will build the item and include it in the game. The legacy item can be a weapon, armor, or accessory (like a cloak, rod, or musical instrument). It should but does not absolutely have to be visible on the character. The legacy item may provide a slight boost (a weapon may be masterwork, for example), but will not have any special magical powers to start.

Cleric Domains: Player character clerics should select a member of the Triad to worship. Druids are most common among the elves, and typically venerate Hosrenu in the aspect of the Worldfather, but a druid can technically be of any race and honor any of the three gods. Clerics can select from the following domains:

Sorevas: Sun, Healing, Protection, Fire
Hosrenu: Knowledge, Magic, Plant, Travel
Laesil: Trickery, Air, War, Water

Advancing Items: Some of the magic items that the party finds in their travels can be upgraded. Advanced items typically have additional powers and/or properties, or have their existing properties upgraded. When an item can be advanced it will be noted in the item description. The DM will prompt you when an item can be upgraded, but typically in those circumstances only one item per group or one item per player can be upgraded. The property that allows an item to be advanced also binds the item to the owner, and cannot be given away or sold without losing the powers that were gained. As such, these items are marked as Plot and cannot be sold to common merchants. If you want to sell such an item, consult with the DM and he will tell you if a buyer can be found in the local area.

Limited Summons: Contact with extraplanar entities is limited in Forgotten Lore (the reasons for this will be addressed in the plot). Low-level summoning spells (e.g., the various “Summon Monster” spells) do not function in this setting. Arcane casters cannot summon familiars and druids cannot summon animal companions. Higher-level summons do work but will draw a great deal of negative attention if used in a public setting (e.g., within a town).

Ban on Necromancy: Several centuries ago, the Three Kingdoms banded together to defeat a terrible and powerful adversary known as the Dead King. This entity relied on necromancy and conjured legions of undead troops to unleash a war that eventually involved all of the Three Kingdoms. Even though much time has passed since these events, the collective trauma lingers and all three kingdoms still have an active ban on the use of necromancy to conjure undead creatures. If a player character casts Animate Dead or a similar spell in a public place they can expect to be arrested or worse.
#14388023 Jul 11, 2020 at 04:14 AM
Veteran DM
130 Posts
Would your heirloom be something that could be upgraded in the manner described? I'm thinking of circumstances where it might affect IC situation that I'd like to avoid, such as if you took a weapon or armour in particular that had been 'passed down the generations'. If it's likely to be replaced then personally I'd be inclined to pick something that is less likely to be affected.
Old enough to know better, too old to care.
#14388166 Jul 11, 2020 at 03:50 PM
Veteran DM
150 Posts
#14388023 Vanya Mia wrote:

Would your heirloom be something that could be upgraded in the manner described? I'm thinking of circumstances where it might affect IC situation that I'd like to avoid, such as if you took a weapon or armour in particular that had been 'passed down the generations'. If it's likely to be replaced then personally I'd be inclined to pick something that is less likely to be affected.


There will be opportunities to upgrade the heirloom items, but it's not mandatory. I've set it up so that you can keep your special item and have it be useful throughout the campaign, gaining power as you do. You will also find items that can be upgraded.
#14390529 Jul 16, 2020 at 02:42 AM
Veteran DM
130 Posts
I've two possible characters/classes in mind, though as usual I'm not wedded to them and willing to change. Both flighty in nature probably.

One a mercenary fighter potentially hired in as the muscle who loves travelling, meeting interesting people and kicking them around a bit if they look at her funny. Sword and board or perhaps dual wielding depending on what any other melee classes want to do.

The other a runaway thief hiding away in the band from those who are out-to-get-her as a straight up rogue. Tricks and traps down the line but stays well away from the action.

Anyone else got thoughts?
Old enough to know better, too old to care.
#14390772 Jul 16, 2020 at 01:43 PM
64 Posts
I also have two options for myself roughly thought out.

1. A somewhat disreputable rogue, who self titles as a 'procurement specialist.' Possibly a half elf that tries to pass for human, and also possibly a bastard of some kind of nobility.

2. A fighter of some kind... okay i haven't thought this one out at all really.
#14391190 Jul 17, 2020 at 05:54 PM
Veteran DM
150 Posts
#14390772 Ayram wrote:

1. A somewhat disreputable rogue, who self titles as a 'procurement specialist.' Possibly a half elf that tries to pass for human, and also possibly a bastard of some kind of nobility.


Not to prod you one way or the other, but that could definitely fit into the storyline.
#14391320 Jul 17, 2020 at 05:12 PM
48 Posts
I am considering an archeologist/historian type of character, probably quite bookish and sheltered, travelling out to the Hinterlands to get their hands on some juicy Mai'i ruins/relics. We don't really seem to have any idea as to what will bring the party together just yet, but I'm guessing that might feature a fair bit, and it sounds like one of the main reasons why adventurin' types would travel to this frontier town.

Was waffling on the subject of class. Have considered rogue (for an amateur Indiana Jones approach?), wizard (for maximum bookishness; glasses clearly not optional) and bard (for maximum loreage? In search of the songs and stories of the Old Ones?) Looks like we've got rogueishness covered, though, so leaning more towards the latter two.

Either way, I imagined them being 'sponsored' by a noble parent who allows them to indulge in their archeological passions. Possibly to the point of being spoiled rotten. Could maybe be some crossover potential there with Ayram's idea?
#14391360 Jul 18, 2020 at 03:11 AM
Veteran DM
150 Posts
#14391320 Sannindi wrote:

I am considering an archeologist/historian type of character, probably quite bookish and sheltered, travelling out to the Hinterlands to get their hands on some juicy Mai'i ruins/relics. We don't really seem to have any idea as to what will bring the party together just yet, but I'm guessing that might feature a fair bit, and it sounds like one of the main reasons why adventurin' types would travel to this frontier town.

Was waffling on the subject of class. Have considered rogue (for an amateur Indiana Jones approach?), wizard (for maximum bookishness; glasses clearly not optional) and bard (for maximum loreage? In search of the songs and stories of the Old Ones?) Looks like we've got rogueishness covered, though, so leaning more towards the latter two.

Either way, I imagined them being 'sponsored' by a noble parent who allows them to indulge in their archeological passions. Possibly to the point of being spoiled rotten. Could maybe be some crossover potential there with Ayram's idea?



Those would all work. A connection to Arresh's nobility will play as well as a connection to Tal Nadesh; the plot will take you to all three kingdoms. And spoiled brats are always fun to play. :)
#14391470 Jul 18, 2020 at 03:22 AM
Veteran DM
130 Posts
#14391320 Sannindi wrote:

I am considering an archeologist/historian type of character, probably quite bookish and sheltered, travelling out to the Hinterlands to get their hands on some juicy Mai'i ruins/relics. We don't really seem to have any idea as to what will bring the party together just yet, but I'm guessing that might feature a fair bit, and it sounds like one of the main reasons why adventurin' types would travel to this frontier town.

Was waffling on the subject of class. Have considered rogue (for an amateur Indiana Jones approach?), wizard (for maximum bookishness; glasses clearly not optional) and bard (for maximum loreage? In search of the songs and stories of the Old Ones?) Looks like we've got rogueishness covered, though, so leaning more towards the latter two.

Either way, I imagined them being 'sponsored' by a noble parent who allows them to indulge in their archeological passions. Possibly to the point of being spoiled rotten. Could maybe be some crossover potential there with Ayram's idea?



Siblings with one legitimate and one illegitimate would amuse. 😆

Also quite happy for the fighter I have in mind to have been hired on by such a character to stop those he/she offends from beating the shit out of them if the type and option fits. "Yeah he's a jerk but he's paying so ... *shrug*" It would make a change for someone other than the biggest baddest fighter to be the nominal party leader!
Old enough to know better, too old to care.
#14391523 Jul 18, 2020 at 06:09 AM
64 Posts
Tank or Monk?


// Pasted from the other thread //

Next campaign? Not sure. I could replay a monk I played way back (either in Eye of the Beholder or HotU) but he would likely need a brother/sister. Else may be a Conan type barbarian.

A Conan type character would likely be a wandering warrior (Barbarian/Fighter/Rogue) in search for adventure. However if we have 2-3 Tanks already may be he would be one too many.

Heirloom would likely be a bastard sword or something.


For the monk (who would be resident in the monastery where we start) he may not be welcome by other party members unless he has got valuable knowledge about the region or a sibling because he is blind. The blindness may be from birth or the result of a fight (war/ambush/skirmish) from the time before he became a monk.

The version I played before had a staff but he could use kama(s) or anything. Family heirloom could be the weapon or a crude amulet.

#14391668 Jul 18, 2020 at 06:50 PM · Edited 21 days ago
Veteran DM
150 Posts
When you describe your heirloom, feel free to give it a quality or ability that can be developed, such as "it helps me focus my thoughts" or "it helps me fly into a battle frenzy." They won't have any special powers at first (maybe a weapon might be masterwork, or a suit of armor might have a minor boost), but who knows what might happen over time...

As I noted in the game, try to get me those ideas by Wednesday, so I can build them into the module.
#14391687 Jul 18, 2020 at 01:18 PM
50 Posts
At the moment, my idea is to go with a Human Fighter. His heirloom item would be a, in his mind, cursed item (Probably a Weapon) that is trying to lead him towards some kind of goal. He's not sure if the item truly is sentient or if he's just going mad, but he converses with it from time to time and it tells him things. He is not entirely sure of what kind of endgame the item has in mind, but for the moment he's been going along with it as it's aid has been useful in the things it has observed and said to him.

If you can use that to benefit the plot / story / setting that would be great, even if it's just on a minor scale. Anywho, that's what I got so far and I'll think on it more.
#14391695 Jul 18, 2020 at 01:36 PM · Edited 20 days ago
65 Posts
Thinking something a little different, like a travelling dwarven merchant or smith, to reflect the dwarven kingdoms. Some approaise, some negotiation, some crafting, some lore. Maybe using bard to represent a blacksmith's little charms.
#14391703 Jul 18, 2020 at 08:03 PM
Veteran DM
150 Posts
Hak List

You should all have these, but in case you need to do a new install, here are the haks used in the module:

CEP version 2.65
Worms Seasonal Forest v10 and Mirkwood Swamp
Bloodmonkey's Rocky Mountains v1.02
#14391704 Jul 18, 2020 at 08:04 PM
Veteran DM
150 Posts
#14391687 Klasa wrote:

At the moment, my idea is to go with a Human Fighter. His heirloom item would be a, in his mind, cursed item (Probably a Weapon) that is trying to lead him towards some kind of goal. He's not sure if the item truly is sentient or if he's just going mad, but he converses with it from time to time and it tells him things. He is not entirely sure of what kind of endgame the item has in mind, but for the moment he's been going along with it as it's aid has been useful in the things it has observed and said to him.

If you can use that to benefit the plot / story / setting that would be great, even if it's just on a minor scale. Anywho, that's what I got so far and I'll think on it more.


This would actually have the potential to be incredibly pertinent to the story.
#14391705 Jul 18, 2020 at 08:07 PM
Veteran DM
150 Posts
#14391695 SmartAlec wrote:

Thinking something a little different, like a travelling dwarven merchant or smith, to reflect the dwarven kingdoms. Some approaise, some negotiation, some crafting, some lore. Maybe using bard to represent a blacksmith's little charms.


Having a dwarf in the group would also be a useful plot connection. Sounds like your heirloom would be something that boosts skills?
#14391706 Jul 18, 2020 at 02:10 PM
65 Posts
A smithing hammer, perhaps! Or a jeweller's eyeglass!
#14391707 Jul 18, 2020 at 08:14 PM
Veteran DM
150 Posts
Regarding weapons/rarity:

This is a relatively low-magic campaign, so powerful weapons are unlikely to turn up frequently. But you can easily secure any kind of basic weapon in Crosspath. If there's something you want that isn't available at the merchants (e.g., a kama), that can easily be manufactured at the local smithy or the monastery.

There are some rare weapons made of elemental steel later in the campaign. You're more likely to find something in common use (e.g., a longsword or battle axe) than something unusual (like a scythe or a sickle). If you intend to invest heavily in feats that are set to a specific kind of weapon (e.g., focus/specialization/weapon of choice), then you should probably choose that weapon to be your heirloom item.

Your heirloom can, of course, be any kind of weapon you desire, or a suit of armor, a cloak, rod, fashion accessory, musical instrument, etc. I think it's cooler if it's something that's visible on the character, but that's not a requirement.
#14391719 Jul 18, 2020 at 02:28 PM
65 Posts
A smithing hammer it can be, then. Maybe something that can be used as a weapon, too, even if that's not what it's usually good for.